World’s Oldest Color Film (just newly discovered)

Here is video of recently discovered footage, considered to be the world’s earliest color film:

Additional information about these first color films can be found HERE.

May Days of Melies – The Dwarf and the Giant [Nain et géant] (1901)

Méliès duplicates himself, and then the duplicate (or is it the original?) grows to an enormous size. 

May Days of Melies – The Devil and the Statue [Le diable géant ou Le miracle de la madonne] (1901)

The Devil and the Statue or, The Miracle of the Madonna (aka Le diable géant ou Le miracle de la madonne) progresses the new re-sizing trick which Méliès unveiled in The Man with the Rubber Head.

 

May Days of Melies – The Man with the India Rubber Head [L’homme à la tête en caoutchouc] (1901)

Méliès unveils a new trick in The Man with the India Rubber Head (aka L’homme à la tête en caoutchouc). A scientist (mad?) brings forth a living head he’s been storing in a box; a head that happens to be identical to the scientist (a clone?). Méliès then begins the new magic by blowing up the head, first with an expansion/contraction, and then literally.

May Days of Melies – The Hat with Many Surprises [Le chapeau à surprises] (1901)

Méliès explores a familiar theme among magicians: the hat trick. You won’t see a rabbit pulled forth, but the alternatives presented are far more spectacular.

May Days of Melies – Bluebeard [Barbe-bleue] (1901)

Bluebeard (aka Barbe-bleue) by Georges Méliès, adapted from the French folktale of the same name by Charles Perrault, contains the oldest known example of product placement in a movie. Keep an eye out for Mercier champagne!

May Days of Melies – Excelsior! The Prince of Magicians (1901)

For the most part, Méliès reveals in this film nothing new from his bag of tricks, but those he does revisit are used to perfection.