Silent Screams – Puppet Masters | The Merry Skeleton (1897)

While Le squelette joyeux (The Merry Skeleton) is more lighthearted fun with little-to-no scares [to us modern viewers], with it the Lumiere brothers lay the groundwork for using special effects to create monster movie magic, which has advanced a tad in the 100+ years since.

In fact, only 3 years later, Frederick Armitage successfully transported the skeleton away from the static black background and onto a pirate ship at sea for Davey Jones’ Locker. The next thing you know, Davy Jones is raising hell in a Disney movie setting sail towards $1 billion dollars, literally. Thanks, Lumiere brothers!

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Silent Screams – The Road to Elm Street | A Nightmare (1896)

Georges Melies — our defending champion — wins spot #2 in the series as well, this time for Le Cauchemar (aka A Nightmare).

It’s not exactly Wes Craven material as the presentation is more humorous than horrific (though Freddy can be a pretty funny dude at times). However, scary movies are so deeply rooted within nightmares that this work by the cinemagician cannot be ignored. It also happens to be highly entertaining and contains excellent stop-motion substitution tricks especially innovative for the time.

Silent Screams – World’s 1st Horror Movie | The Devil’s Castle (1896)

Considered the first horror movie — and arguably the first vampire movie — Le manoir du diable (aka The Devil’s Castle) is an 1896 Georges Melies film that runs for over 3 minutes, an astonishing length for the time.

The film has been known by a variety of alternate names — The Devil’s Manor, The Manor of the Devil, The House of the Devil, and The Haunted Castle — the latter is actually a different movie by Méliès, made 1 year later on the same set and with many of the same costumes. It is also notable for containing some of the earliest hand-tinting of images.

From Muted Mayhem to Silent Screams

Way back on the first day of Summer, I began a “Slapstick Series” to explore the earliest days of that comedic genre within film. Along the way, I took a break to focus on THIS — which still takes up much of my time and attention (please help!) — and didn’t quite make it all the way to my intended grand finale double-feature.

Speaking of which, I’d planned to end with the 1st Harold Lloyd appearance as his “Glasses” character, followed by the 1st movie written, directed, and starring Buster Keaton. Looks like now I’ve got a pretty strong opening bill lined up for next Summer instead.

But now it’s October and my favorite time of year. The days shorten, the leaves are dying and falling to the ground where they’ll decompose. Soon it’ll be Halloween. And thus the perfect time to explore Horror movies in their infancy, which I plan to do in a “Silent Screams” series starting tomorrow.

As for the 2012 Summer Slapstick Series — R.I.P., you were loved. Below are each of its entries, listed alongside the silent film spotlighted within:

  1. The 1st Movie ComedyThe Sprinkler Sprinkled (1895)
  2. Wrestling w/ MeliesThe Fat and Lean Wrestling Match (1900)
  3. The 1st True SlapstickAn Interesting Story (1904)
  4. Pre-IconicA Story Well Spun (1906)
  5. Exhibit E. PorterGetting Evidence (1906)
  6. Key Stepping StoneThe Policemen’s Little Run (1907)
  7. A Killer JokeThat Fatal Sneeze (1907)
  8. The Original Queen of ComedyLaughing Gas (1907)
  9. Dark ComedyThe Thieving Hand (1908)
  10. A Step BackThe Runaway Horse (1908)
  11. TimelessA Very Fine Lady (1908)
  12. Outside The TableauChimney Sweep (1906)
  13. Key Foundation CornerstoneThe Bricklayers (1905)
  14. VaudevilliansRobetta and Doretto, No. 2 (1895)
  15. The 1st Pie FaceMr. Flip (1909)
  16. Ladies, Please!Those Awful Hats (1909)
  17. Multilevel ComedyThe Irresistible Piano (1907)
  18. Semi-MetaA Fall from Five Floors (1906)
  19. Don’t Sleep on TheseThe Rolling Bed (1907)
  20. A Vehicle for ComedyThe ‘?’ Motorist (1906)
  21. Passing the TorchThe Race for the Sausage (1907)
  22. Laugh OlympicsAn Obstacle Course (1906)
  23. When Harry Met ZeccaSlippery Jim (1910)
  24. Character DevelopmentHow Bumptious Papered the Parlour (1910)
  25. Moving OnAlkali Ike’s Auto (1911)
  26. Comedic Timing – Onésime, Clockmaker (1912)
  27. Before The FameTroublesome Secretaries (1911)
  28. Laugh With LinderTroubles of a Grasswidower (1912)
  29. Keystone Mack [Sennett] DaddyThe Water Nymph (1912)
  30. Keystone “Cops”The Bangville Police (1913)
  31. Villainy DefinedBarney Oldfield’s Race for a Life (1913)
  32. The 1st FattyPeeping Pete (1913)
  33. Chaplin’s First FilmMaking a Living (1914)
  34. The Tramp AppearsKid Auto Races at Venice (1914)
  35. Creating The TrampMabel’s Strange Predicament (1914)
  36. The Movie DickPool Sharks (1915)
  37. The Super FriendsA Film Johnnie (1914)
  38. Two of a KindFox Trot Finesse (1915)
  39. Laurel before Hardy, Hardy before Laurel – The Servant Girl’s Legacy (1914)
Hope you enjoy, and thank you!

 

 

September Slapstick: Laurel before Hardy, Hardy before Laurel

Laurel and Hardy were the first double act to gain worldwide fame through film. Together, they made over 100 movies — 32 were silent shorts, 23 were feature-length and contained sound. However, each was already well-established before joining as a duo:

Stanley Arthur “Stan” Jefferson [Laurel] was the older of the two. A music-hall understudy to Charlie Chaplin (pre-Keystone), he appeared in over 50 films. Buster Keaton commented on Laurel’s talent, “Chaplin wasn’t the funniest, I wasn’t the funniest, this man was the funniest.” Below is an early Larry Semon vehicle, Huns and Hyphens, which features a pre-L&H Laurel.

Oliver “Babe” Hardy, affectionately known as Ollie, began his movie career before Laurel, resulting in over 250 films before their team-up. He was from Georgia, my home (and current) state, but I won’t hold that against him. Below is The Servant Girl’s Legacy (dir. Arthur Hotaling), a short from 1914 featuring a 22-year-old Hardy.

September Slapstick: Two of a Kind | Fox Trot Finesse (1915)

I’m including Fox Trot Finesse (dir. Maurice Morris) in this Slapstick Series for 3 reasons:

  1. Mr. & Mrs. Sidney Drew were one of the 1st silent film comedy teams.
  2. Sidney was the uncle of John, Lionel, and Ethel Barrymore (and therefore the great-granduncle of Drew Barrymore).
  3. Mrs. Sidney Drew is a spiritual ancestor to the Fake Shemp. Very soon after the death of Drew’s 1st wife — the original Mrs. Sidney Drew (Gladys Rankin) — he married Lucile McVey, who became the new Mrs. Sidney Drew character.
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew have a joint Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, though I am unsure whether that is for Mrs. Drew #1 or #2.

September Slapstick: The Super Friends | A Film Johnnie (1914)

On this final day of September, I’m posting a couple entries on silent comedy teams — those two are coming later today.

Before that, I wanted to give a final shout-out to Mack Sennett and his repertory players, specifically Charlie Chaplin, Mabel Normand, Fatty Arbuckle, and Ford Sterling. They all make an appearance in A Film Johnnie, a meta-movie directed by George Nichols, in which Chaplin visits the Keystone Studios lot. The mayhem that follows is a prelude to the real-life relationship difficulties that soon existed between each of these stars.