Slapstick Summer Series: A Vehicle for Comedy | The ‘?’ Motorist (1906)

Perhaps the most fantastic slapstick of the century’s 1st decade, the influence of Melies is obvious [note: R.W. Paul, producer and cinematographer of “The ‘?’ Motorist”, built the 1st camera used by Melies].

However, unlike most works by his fellow cinemagician, Walter R. Booth’s “Mad Motorist” is not constrained to the theater-style setting. Alternating between studio sets and external shots, the chaos is taken to new heights, literally. Seriously, man, it’s out of this world.

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RIP Ray Bradbury, The Illustrious Man



“The things that you do should be things that you love. And things that you love should be things that you do.”Ray Douglas Bradbury, (1920 – 2012)

May Days of Melies – The Witch’s Revenge [Le sorcier] (1903)

A King is blessed to have fulfilled the fantasy of many men and women: a sorcerer to summon a beautiful mate (with accompanying handmaidens), just for him. But he blows it, of course, after being offended by one of the magician’s follow-up tricks in which the throne is temporarily occupied by someone other than himself. Psssh, men. Typical.

May Days of Melies – Gulliver’s Travels Among the Lilliputians and the Giants [Le voyage de Gulliver à Lilliput et chez les géants] (1902)

A swift (4-minute) adaptation of Gulliver’s Travels (formally, Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships), the 1726 satirical novel by Jonathan Swift. The movie is less focused on developing the plot as a narrative, and more attentive towards recreating and presenting some of the fantastic elements within the story, as alluded to by the title, Le voyage de Gulliver à Lilliput et chez les géants (aka Gulliver’s Travels Among the Lilliputians and the Giants). The visual accomplishments of Méliès are most impressive, especially the amazing hand-painting of frames.

Music performed by Billy Duncan for Change Before Going Productions.